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20131029
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the national security agency or national security desk, why didn't we try to send somebody from somewhere? what happened? >> hi, chris. i think people need to understand this is a situation where as much as the people on the ground working with the state department in libya knew that the threat was there and requested security, the state department just wasn't prepared to deal with this situation. and by being prepared, you have a list of things that when something goes wrong like this you go down that list and make certain phone calls and notify certain people. and that just wasn't the case. they had numbers from the d.o.d. that had expired. then you run into a situation where these agencies, the cia, the state department, and the military don't necessarily talk to each other and are in communications as much as you'd think. >> you know, as an american that doesn't work for me. the president, the security agency people are sitting in the white house. they're getting an instantaneous report of what's going on there. what weren't they looking at? where was the u.s. cavalry to use an american ima
national security. >> reporter: the head of the national security agency will testify before the house intelligence committee tomorrow. later this week, german officials will meet here at the white house with top presidential advisors to seek written guarantees that u.s. surveillance of their government and its leaders is over for good. >> pelley: major, thanks very much. criticism this month of the affordable care act has focused largely on the trouble with that people are having signing up for insurance online. but the problems with the law that the president himself calls obamacare go far beyond the government website. and dean reynolds has been digging into this. >> reporter: the calls insurance broker rich fawn is getting these days are coming from both his business and individual customers. >> nobody fully has a complete 100% understanding of the affordable care act. >> reporter: nobody knows how many people will participate, he says, so insurance companies are offering higher premiums than many anticipated until things settle downs do annoyance of his customers. >> because the a
stories. in the wake of repeated real aggravations about national security agencies spying. the chief of the nsa and director of national intelligence testified before congress put forward tuesday which stopped the nsa widespread surveillance of phone records. >> i want to apologize to you that the website has not worked as well as it should. >> an apology from marilyn tavanner about the problems of the affordable care act website. testifying before a sharply critical house committee. it has been one year since hurricane sandy hit the northeast and people are still dealing with insurance claims to clean up of hurricane sandy estimated to be around $65 billion. u.n. officials confirm an outbreak of polio and syria the first in 14 years. there are ten confirmed cases, most of those tested are babies and toddlers. last week the u.s. launched a campaign to immunize 2.5 million children against polio and other diseases. those are the headlines here on al jazeera. real money with ali velshi is next. >> we've all heard if you like your plan you can keep it. not so fast. while millions who al
is the head of the national security agency, this is his life testimony before congress. there have been no willful violations. there have been 12 other a decade. the majority of those were done in foreign space on foreigners. i think that's important to understand. for our foreign partners and our allies. we hold ourselves to that same standard. no matter if we operate here or abroad. if we do something that does not fall within an intelligence requirement, it is wrong. so we hold our people accountability and we report to this committee. as we go forward in the future, one thing we talks about, this is a tough time for nsa, where everybody says what are you doing, or why are you doing it. but leer is what we do. when we get together, we don't -- well, maybe a couple times weeweeing but we say, it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings, and it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs then having given them up, and have
, the head of the nsa, the national security agency, general keith alexander and others who lawmakers want to ask, how extensive are these surveillance programs? why are they necessary? and particularly as we've learned of late, why are we tapping cell phones and other conversations of our allies, of world leaders like angela merkel, the german chancellor. the germans are really upset about this. they're calling for an investigation. even some democrats are saying it's over the top to tap cell phones of our allies like senator dianne feinstein. her senate intelligence committee may also be looking into this. in a statement, she said "with respect to nsa collection of intelligence on leaders of u.s. al allies, let me state unequivocally, i am totally opposed. i do not believe the united states should be collecting phone calls or e-mails of friendly presidents and prime ministers." like merkel. that's why the eu, the european union, has people here in washington asking questions, and now am a senior administration official says they may phase out that part of the program. richard? >> tracie,
and the national security agency pushed back. >> one of the first things i learned in intel school in 1963 is that this is the fundamental giveen in the intelligence. >> woodruff: that fundamental according to director of national intelligence james clapper, is learning the intentions of foreign leaders, even if it means spying on allies. what's more, he told today's house hearing it's a two-way street. >> do you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence services, our leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> there have been disclosures in recent days that the national security agency eavesdroped on german chancellor angela merkel. the n.s.a.'s director, army general keith al sander the, defended the general practice of surveillance in the u.s. and abroad to prevent terrorist attacks. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck! they didn't stop hating us. they didn't say that they were going to just forgive this. they continue to try. it is the great me
of the national security agency which as you know are under fire since the revelation by former nsa analyst edward snowden that revealed documents that showed that they had been listen together phone conversation or scooping up the phone numbers of conversation of american citizens. the director of national intelligence said that the information was gathered legally, and the content is only available to a handful of people. >> everything that we do on this program is audited 100%. on the business records. 100%. the da data is kept separate frm all the other data we have. it's important to understand that the leaker did not have access to this data period. >> so randall, are these hearings setting the stage for the usa freedom act, and if so what would that legislation mean? what would it entail? >> reporter: well, yes, indeed. the hearings are setting the stage for the freedom act. the freedom act would be an amendment of the patriot okay, and what it would not do is restrict the power of the nsa to gather intelligence but plays some new rules. for example, it would end the "dragnet" collection of
on with the national security agency. because you jointly oversee the a senior member of the national security community, this is in your portfolio as well. what did you know about the collection of intelligence from communications? when did you know about it? have you discussed it with the president? do you feel it is appropriate, why is it appropriate? mr. minister, how worried is your government that the united states is intercepting your communications and what does this do to new zealand's trust with the u.s.? barbara, i don't discuss conversations in national security council meetings. i certainly don't discuss publicly conversations we had regarding intelligence. we are examining all of the different dynamics that are now out there and the procedures and the processes. the white house has been very clear on that. those who lead our intelligence community have been very clear on that. we have great respect for our partners, our allies who cooperate with us and we cooperate with them to try to keep the world safe and to keep each other safe, to keep our nation safe. intelligence is a key
thought that the car would hit us and we would die right there. >> the extent of the national security agency's monitoring of foreigners has stepped up. the united nations has just said that 10 cases of polio have been confirmed amongst children in syria and there is a risk that an outbreak will spread. the century-old idea to link europe and asia with the tunnel. the turkish prime minister is about to open the undersea rail link between both continents. so, with the car crash an explosion in tandem and square, premeditated suicide attack in the heart of the chinese capital , one report from an unnamed source suggests that it was. five people died after the suv mounted the payment -- mounted the pavement. bursting into flames next of wall of the forbidden city, they had a lucky escape. >> we thought the car was heading for us and we had no way to run from it. i thought the car would hit us and we would die right there. but it hit a marble railing. we were standing at the back. bit, thated a little would have been the end of us. >> we have an unnamed source speaking to the reuters news
. ♪ ♪ >>> u.s. press barack obama has ordered a review of the national security agency intelligence operations acknowledge that go more constraints are needing. obama is being fiercely criticized over allegations the national security agency tapped german chancellor angela merkel's phone and snoop odd other european allies. white house spokesman jay karen said it would look to to the concerns of other country. here are the details. >> reporter: at the white house, the presidential spokesman refused to be drawn on the reports that the u.s. tracked millions of spanish foal calls but reported the nsa surveillance programs are being examined. >> we are conducting a review. we are mindful that some of these disclosure have his caused tension in our relationships. with new capabilities, we recognize that there need to be additional constraints on how we gather and use intelligence. >> reporter: tensions spikes with reports in germany suggesting that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of german chancellor angela mechanical's phone in 2010 and fast tracked any information gathered directl
ferrari has our story. >> a bipartisan group of lawmakers, curtail the national security agency's indistric indiscriminate,. >> james sensenbrenner. , provides stronger restrictions against who the nsa can target when it comes to spying and require the government to delete information it collects accidentally, more aggressively than it does now. the bill reportedly has a dozen co-sponsors in the senate and 70 in the house. meanwhile senator dianne feinstein, the democratic head of the intelligence committee, in a statement feinstein said i am totally opposed to nsa surveillance of u.s. allies. it is abundantly clear that a total review of all intelligence programs is necessary. the white house says that president obama was not aware of just how extensive the nsa's intelligence gathering was until this summer but the president insists there will be a complete review of the nsa's spying policy. >> what we've seen over the last several years is their capacity has continued to develop and expand and that's why i'm initiating a review to make sure that what they're able to do doesn't
of national intelligence and general keith alexander, the head of the national security agency, the nsa, will be testifying answering questions, presumably about the nsa surveilance program including reports over the past few days that the u.s. has been spying on allied leaders, including monitoring the personal cell phone of the german chancellor angela merkel. we'll monitor what's going on, bring you the highlights. stand by for that. right now he's just opening up the hearing. meanwhile, president obama is being hammered on many fronts right now. how much did he know about the surveilance of friendly allies? why didn't he know about the problems that were going to plague the health care website? i want you to listen to part of the new article from cnn's chief political analyst gloria borger she just wrote and posted on cnn.com. i'll read you a line. the ultimate irony may be this. a president who extols the virtues of government has now been sucked into the big government vortex experiencing up close and personal as they say what it feels like to lose control to the bureaucrats. the
, james clapper, and the al keith alexander, director of the national security agency and the head of u.s. cybercommand. next an update on the affordableion of the care act and the status of the website for signing up for health insurance. washington journal, this is 40 minutes. >> joining us for a discussion, serving as a rie senior correspondent. welcome. >> thank you. >> what's the latest we know the condition of the website. >> the subcontractor is part of verizon had an outage last night. morning.till down this i checked before i arrived. that's a woe in the long saga dogged health care.gov. there was a congressional earing in the house where key contractors came in, talked about how they recommended more earlier. was not done. how the last minute the federal the ials turned off browsing function to require people make accounts. that created a backlog. hearings.ore a lot of attention and focus on the website. allowed to useot the website -- from the time they saw, they were not able to use the website at all? >> you get the home page. i clicked -- i have been able to set up an acco
security agency is conducting surveillance, on american citizens within the united states. specifically under the u.s. patriot act which was passed after 9/11, and the national intelligence directors, clapper, james clapper and alexander will be trying to describe to what degrees they have complied with the law. they insist and they just recently actually overnight released several declassified documents trying to show that they have been complied with the directives of the secret u.s. foreign surveillance intelligence court. and that in one instance, several instances where they did exceed the boundaries allowed by that court, that they pulled back, and subsequently, the court approved their methods. so again, this is -- this won't necessarily deal with the extent with which american intelligence agencies are actually spying on foreign leaders. >> okay, tom ackerman, thank you very much, indeed. >> was it a simple car crash or a point to drive home a point by choinchinese ethnic minority? in china am teenen men square. reporting from hong kong. >> around the square normally subjected t
is thecn best-kept secret left in washington d.c. b the national security agency could learn something from secretary sebelius. unanimous consent -- later today -- to approve a six-page require thein administration to answer these questions every week. secretary sebelius is not responsible for enactingut obamacare, but she has been responsible for three and ars one-half years for implementing it. now many americans have only a few weeks to purchase new insurance or be without health insurance. to expect the secretary to correct in a few weeks what she's not been able to do in three and one-half years is unrealistic. mr. president, it's time for the president to ask the secretary of health and human services toc resign. r i thankes the president, and i yield the floor. be. >> today's white house briefing expected to get under way in just a moment. we will have it live here on c-span2 when it starts. earlier during general speeches in the senate we heard a series of senators talking about the one-year anniversary of hurricane sandy hitting the east coast of the u.s. and recovery efforts. hurr
. >> lawmakers are expected to introduce a bill occur tailing the national security agencies powers to indiscriminately collect personal information. the u.s.a. freedom act is authored by patrick lay he. >> i did would provide stronger restrictions and require the government to delete information it collects accidentally more aggressively than it does now. the bill has a dozen co sponsors in the senate and 70 in the house. meanwhile, senator dianne feinstein, the democratic head of the senate intelligence committee, who has been a staunch defender of the n.s.a. is among those criticizing the agencies monitoring of world leaders like german chancellor angela merkel. insta statement, she said: the white house says president obama was not aware of just how extensive the n.s.a.'s intelligence gathering was until this summer, but the president insists there will be a complete review of the n.s.a.'s spying policy. >> what we've seen over the last several years is their pass has continued to develop and expand and that's why i'm initiating now a review to make sure that what they're able t
on with the national security agency. mr. secretary, to start with you, because you jointly oversea the nsa and as a senior member of the national security committee, clearly, this is in your portfolio as well, so what did you know about collection of intelligence from world leaders communications whether it was data or whatever it was, what did you know about it? when did you know about it, and have you discussed it with the president and feel it appropriate? why is it appropriate? mr. minister, how worried is your government that the united states is intercepting communications, and what does this do to new zealand's trust with the u.s.. first, mr. secretary. >> barbara, i don't discuss conversations i have in national security counsel meetings. i certainly don't discuss publicly conversations that we have regarding intelligence. we are examining dynamics out there and procedures and processes, i think, the white house has been very clear on that; and i think those who lead intelligence community even very clear on that. we have great respect for our partners, allies who cooperate with us
? >> brooke, you're absolutely right. we cannot dispense what the national security agency -- i spent my entire career going after human sources. at the end of the day, it was the national security agency which kept us safe. let's don't damage this organization. let's just try to clean it up. >> bob baer, thank you very much. and the name marilyn tavenner may not ring a bell with anyone, but she's in the spotlight today. she's in charge of the agency that created the healthcare.gov website. the very same website that has been universally criticized and mocked ever since it went live. today's hearing started with "i'm sorry." >> we know that consumers are eager to purchase this coverage, and to the millions of americans who have attempted to use healthcare.gov to shop and enroll in healthcare coverage, i want to apologize to you that the website has not worked as well as it should. >> from there, marilyn tavenner offered a steady defense of the overall obama care program. the website will be fixed, she promised, and in the long run more americans will have better coverage. cnn investigati
with the security agencies and intelligence agencies of other nations, of allied nations. i'm not going to get into the specific alleged activities, intelligence activities, of the united states or our allies. we're obviously more broadly engaged in a review as i discussed at length yesterday of our intelligence gathering activities, mindful of the fact that because of the explosion in our technological capacities , we need to look at and make sure that we are not just gathering intelligence because we can, but we're gathering it because we need it specifically and that review is under way at the president's direction and will be completed by the end of the year. >> one of the things that officials say of the review is the surveillance of allied heads of state. is the administration's plan to conduct this review and tell the public of its outcomes all at once or is it possible that we could learn in the coming days or a shorter time frame of the decision on that specific program ahead of speed, surveillance? >> i think generally speaking you should expect it upon conclusion of the review. we w
of the morning. the white house is reviewing all u.s. surveillance programs after reports national security agency was spying on some 35 world leaders and the top senator on the senate intelligence committee says he is totally opposed to that surveillance and that data collection will not continue. cnn's chief national correspondent john king is here to talk more about all of this. it's pretty interesting where things have gotten with this spying controversy, john. the white house is saying they're going to review the spying policy of foreign leaders but dianne feinstein, she is not happy. she says she's been kept in the dark and wants a further review that she's going to spreer heea. >> dianne feinstein was a defender of the nsa, saying most of the intelligence gathering was necessary. but she defended most of the practices. now she's not happy. she doesn't think she's getting straight answers from the agency and sometimes the white house. she's promising tougher scrutiny. that's a signal to the administration, significantly in this latest case she put out a statement saying the administra
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)